Spring is in the air in California, and as the weather warms up, it’s a treat to see some of the animals that call our open space their home. Everyone likes seeing butterflies, birds and bobcats while out exploring the trails, but who enjoys seeing snakes? I know that I do, but many people’s initial response to encountering a snake is fear or disgust. Why do snakes get a bad rap? A fear of snakes runs deep through ancient mythology and the Bible, but our disdain is misguided.

Snakes are cold-blooded reptiles that are secondary consumers (they eat animals that eat plants) and fall into the middle of the food web. They play an important role in our local ecosystem by controlling rodent populations and by providing food for raptors.

People are often scared of snakes, but in reality, snakes are also scared of people! The best defense a snake has is to avoid confrontation by slithering away or by warning others to stay away (like rattlesnakes do). Although you don’t need to be scared of snakes, you should be careful when you see one and give them their space.

Here are some tips to keep in mind:

  • Be alert during warmer weather and in the evening when snakes are most active.
  • Never put your hands or feet where you can’t see them.
  • Wear closed-toed shoes on the trail.
  • Stick to the trail! Snakes can be hard to see in tall grass and in rock crevices.
  • Learn to identify the common species in the OC.
  • Remember not to panic if you see a snake – this is their home!

Next time you’re out on the trail and see a snake, stop and observe it for a while. You might be surprised to find yourself enjoying snakes after all! 🙂

Nineteen different species of snake make their home in Orange County. Snakes most often encountered in the wild in Orange County include:

 

Gopher snake (Pituophis catenifer)

 

Southern Pacific rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus helleri)

 

California kingsnake (Lampropeltis getula californiae)


Interested in learning more about snakes, and even getting the opportunity to touch one yourself?
Register now for our RATTLESNAKE! event in Aliso and Wood Canyons Wilderness Park on Saturday, April 29th. See and even touch live, non-venomous snakes displayed by snake researcher Steve Bledsoe of Southwestern Field Herping Associates. Enjoy fun crafts. Learn to ID rattlesnakes and what to do if you encounter one. Come prepared to have your most interesting snake questions answered!

“Look around, look around at how lucky we are…!” – Hamilton

Today, April 6, is California Poppy Day. Those of us who grew up in California know that when we see poppies starting to bloom, spring is here. Driving up the coast or hiking in the hills, orange is everywhere. Having learned in my SoCal elementary school (way back in the day) that it is our state flower, the sight of poppies always gives me a great sense of pride for “my” beautiful state, California.

The California poppy, with its bright orange and gold colors, generally opens only in bright sun and represents California well: California’s beautiful orange sunsets; California’s gold rush; our very own Orange County. The color orange is composed of equal parts of red (energy) and yellow (happiness). And while many outside of California might think of us as a little laid-back, I’d like to think, living in this wonderful place, we simply have a great balance of energy and happiness.

Even its many names give homage to the California poppy’s brightness and light: golden poppy, California sunlight, and copa de oro (cup of gold).

So it wasn’t a surprise that back in 1890 when the California State Floral Society held an election to determine California’s state flower, the California poppy was a home run winner over the other two beautiful flowers in the running: the matilija poppy and the mariposa lily. In 1903, the California legislature officially named the California poppy our state flower.

And, even before that “official” proceeding, local Native Americans, keenly sensitive to their land, knew the value of the poppies. They used the plant parts in various ways to alleviate aches and pains and as an anti-anxiety remedy.

It should be noted that although the California poppy is a distant cousin to the opium poppy, the California Poppy contains no opiates. WebMD states the California poppy contains chemicals that may cause relaxation.

Where do we see them?

California poppies grow in southern California, of course, as well as desert areas such as the Mojave Desert. They are seen as far north as southern Washington and as far south as Baja, Mexico.

When do we see them?

While usually the biggest bloom is in the spring, California poppies can flower from February through September, sometimes longer, depending on the weather and rain.

What are those things?

The California poppy plant has green-grey leaves. The flower buds under calyx cap. The calyx cap lifts off as the flower blossoms, exposing a furled flower ready to open. The California poppy closes, as a defense mechanism, if it becomes cloudy, opening again to the sun. How California cool is that!?! And, if you’re wondering what that longer “bud” (not really a bud) is, it is the poppy’s seed pod.

The California poppy lives up to its sunshine hype. “Look Around, Look Around…” Find a field of them and it will surely give you happiness and energy.

 

Happy California Poppy Day!

Aliso Creek stretches for 19 miles through our cities and canyons, originating in the foothills of the Santa Ana Mountains and culminating in a tidal lagoon at Aliso Beach. In the 1800s, Spanish explorers named the creek Aliso, meaning alder, in reverence of the existing riparian vegetation. The creek was the historical boundary between the Acjachemem and Tongva tribes and contains sensitive archaeological resources.

The Aliso Creek watershed is primarily urban and suburban. Very little wilderness or undisturbed land remains in the watershed outside of the immediate vicinity of Aliso Creek and the 4,000+ acre Aliso and Wood Canyons Wilderness Park, making the this area particularly crucial for a range of wildlife. A variety of native habitats, including willow scrub, riparian woodland, and mulefat scrub, exists within the watershed. This diverse habitat is the home of several endangered or threatened species, including Least Bell’s Vireo, Southwestern Pond Turtle, Coast Horned Lizard, and others.  The creek is a critical corridor for wildlife moving into the South Coast Wilderness, allowing animals safe passage even through developed areas while providing access to food, water and shelter.

Today, the creek needs our help. Aliso Creek and the plant community it sustains is possibly the most degraded major riparian corridor in Orange County, having suffered from a long history of pollution, development, invasive Arundo (giant cane) infestation, access limitations, and neglect. For over 40 years, local land managers, nonprofit organizations, state and federal wildlife agencies, and the public have all advocated for restoration of the creek and its banks. Laguna Canyon Foundation and its partners have led a multi-year effort to initiate the restoration of Aliso Creek from its headwaters to its ocean outflow. The 55-acre Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) Measure M Aliso Creek project has removed 30 acres of Arundo from the watershed and begun to restore native vegetation to a critical section of the creek.

In order to preserve the creek and the wildlife it supports, Laguna Canyon Foundation and its partners and volunteers work to remove invasive vegetation and replant natives. A diverse native plant community provides habitat for a variety of local wildlife, including endangered species like the Least Bell’s Vireo, and helps the ecosystem resist destruction by drought, fire, flood, or future takeovers by invasive species such as Arundo.

The Aliso Creek Regional Bikeway, Riding and Hiking Trail runs for 15 miles from the Santa Ana Mountains to Laguna Beach, offering many opportunities to enjoy the wildlife and scenic beauty of Aliso Creek.  Interested in getting off the trail and adopting the creek and areas surrounding it? Join us at one of our monthly Keep It Wild events in Aliso and Wood Canyons Wilderness Park to help out with planting natives, weed removal or trash pick-up!


What Smells?

After all this glorious rain, the canyon is alive with earthy scents that linger in the cool, moist air of the trails. One of the many experiences that Laguna Canyon Foundation’s educators share with the young students as they hike through the canyon is what to smell: white sage (pictured), California sagebrush, everlasting, and bladderpod, just to name a few.

The educators teach the children how the local Native Americans, the Acjachemen, used white sage as a purifying incense at ceremonies and gatherings (and still do today). “Tar,” “cannabis,” and “lemon” are some of the words used to describe the scent of white sage. Quite a variety, right? And that is the beauty of the whole olfactory experience. We all sense scents differently.

The Acjachemen used California sagebrush as insect repellent and as bedding to drive away fleas. Folklore has it that it was also used by cowboys to mask their sweaty body odor after a long day herding cattle, thus its nickname “cowboy cologne.” For the most part, California sagebrush gets the children’s top vote for the best smelling. “Kinda minty,” says one student. “Smells like something my mom uses in the kitchen,” says another.

Everlasting, also known as cudweed, has a very interesting name as well as an interesting scent. Most people think of maple syrup when they smell it; a few think of vanilla. Recently, a fifth grade student, Angel, said it smelled like a pencil, to which the educator gave him a high five. “I get that connection,” she said. “A pencil is made from wood, or bark; maple syrup comes from wood and bark.”

 

What Stinks?

Then there are the less celebrated creatures and plants of the canyon that may rival in pungency but don’t get as much love, because frankly, they stink.

When hiking by a bladderpod, the students chuckle at the name and the “bladders” dangling from its stems. Most don’t like the smell, which has been likened to “burnt hair” and “burnt popcorn,” but, the educators explain, the bladderpod is a source of pollen for bees, nectar for hummingbirds, and shade for many animals, providing vital resources for the ecosystem.

If you’ve ever hiked in Laguna Coast Wilderness Park, you’ve likely seen the stink beetle – a long-legged black bug about an inch in length – usually wandering around a little aimlessly. Most of the children will scream when they see it or try to poke it, which, of course, the educators forbid. With all the commotion, the stink beetle will do what stink beetles do: stick up its hind end into the air, as if doing a headstand, ready to squirt its chemical-smelling liquid to ward off predators. The scene turns into yet another teaching moment. The students learn that stink beetles, with their rather humble moniker, provide a great service in the open space. They are decomposers, breaking down organic matter, including animal waste.

Who wouldn’t take the dare to grab a big whiff of a plant called stinking gourd? Most of us would shun the idea, and with good reason. You don’t have to be anywhere close to that plant to smell what some describe as “dirty socks,” “body odor,” and “sulfur.” But, as with all native plants in our open space, stinking gourd has its role. The Acjachemen used its seeds for meal and its roots as soap. Sometimes called the “coyote gourd,” its fruit is a source of food for the coyote.

 

Stinks? Smells? Potato? Potahto?

With all our social media use, we can share much, including many of the beautiful sights and sounds of the open space. We cannot share smells digitally. That experience needs to be in person. So, go smell for yourself! What stinks to some is beautiful perfume to others. As the saying goes, “That’s why God made chocolate and vanilla.”

We live in such a special – and important – place. The South Coast Wilderness is a unique area that is included in the California Floristic Province, which is designated as a global biodiversity hotspot. To qualify as a global biodiversity hotspot, an area must have at least 1,500 endemic species (species found nowhere else on the planet), and have lost at least 70% of its native vegetation.

Our mission at Laguna Canyon Foundation is to protect, preserve, enhance and promote the South Coast Wilderness. A great way to do all of these things is to participate in stewardship activities. Stewardship in this sense means taking responsibility for the care and management of the land. This may take many forms, including removing invasive species from sensitive native habitats, adding native plants in degraded areas to restore them to their historic condition, or educating the general public about the beauty, ecology and threats to our wild lands. All of these activities can greatly impact the native habitats that are found in the open space, and help the unique, threatened, and endangered species that make the South Coast Wilderness such an important place to preserve and protect.

An undisturbed native habitat supports a diverse population of plants and wildlife, while a disturbed habitat does not make a good home.Take a moment to imagine a hillside of mustard versus a hillside full of native plants like sagebrush (Artemisia californica), buckwheat (Eriogonum fasciculatum), and lemonadeberry (Rhus integrifolia). While wildlife can use mustard for food and shelter, most species greatly prefer the native hillside, with a variety of insect hosts, different seed types, and a varied blooming schedule.

There are no requirements or special skills needed to be a steward except the motivation to show up and participate. So, what are you waiting for? Come join the fun and learn more about stewardship with LCF! Sign up for a volunteer day on our Eventbrite page, and find out for yourself what it’s all about.

Upcoming LCF stewardship events:
 
• Sat 2/25 Nursery and Plant Care at Willow – Laguna Coast Wilderness Park
• Tues 2/28 LCF Restoration Stewardship Day – Aliso & Wood Canyons Wilderness Park
• Sat 3/18 Keep it Wild Volunteer Day – Laguna Coast Wilderness Park and Aliso & Wood Canyons Wilderness Park

 

Interested in learning more about habitat restoration and stewardship? Sign up for our monthly Restoration Team Newsletter using the form below!

 

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Laguna Ridge Trail, also known as T&A, started out life as a ranch road. For many years, this trail was a favorite of the small cadre of Laguna Beach mountain bikers, and despite its steep, fall-line alignment, it stayed a stable, narrow singletrack for over a decade through the 1980s and early 1990s.

Starting with the wildfires in 1993 and culminating with the El Nino rains in 2010, a series of natural events and a dramatic increase in users began causing erosion problems along the trail. For those of you who have been riding since then, you’ve seen the trail change from a primitive, narrow singletrack to a 40-foot-wide rock-choked gully. For years up until the present day, these sections continued to widen as most trail users avoided the jumbled centerline and stayed on the margins, damaging the fragile native vegetation and further eroding the trailbed. If nothing was done, this damage would have continued to degrade both the trail itself and the surrounding habitat, possibly resulting in a complete closure of the entire trail.

OC Parks and Laguna Canyon Foundation, working together to assess trails in the wilderness parks, identified Laguna Ridge as a top priority, and concluded that the first step in saving this trail would be to reroute the top section off of the fall-line to create a longer and more gradual grade. This would render the trail more sustainable and have the added benefit of being rideable uphill as well as down. LCF Staff worked closely with OC Parks in 2014 to design a reroute that would strike a balance between protecting the surrounding sensitive habitat and maximizing the user experience and long-term trail sustainability.

LCF volunteer crews and staff worked tirelessly through the 2015-2016 season to build the 0.3-mile reroute, only to have a wildfire burn through the area in June 2016, resulting in the closure of the trail. We stabilized the new alignment by installing erosion control measures and placing brush to prevent users from shortcutting through the burned areas. Once this work was accomplished, the trail was reopened in October 2016.

Last month (January 2017), OC Parks brought in a contractor to begin the decommissioning of the original trail alignment. The contractor used heavy equipment to break up the compacted trailbed, recontour the channelized slopes, and divert water from the old alignment to prevent further erosion. While using a backhoe to tear up a rocky slope in a wilderness park may seem extreme, it is the only practical way of addressing the scale of the damage that has been caused to this area over the life of this trail.

LCF will soon begin work with the Orange County Conservation Corps to plant and seed this area with native plants in order to restore the impacted area to healthy native habitat as required by OC Parks’ conservation mandate. We will also be working in the burned area to help protect it as it heals from the fire. We will continue to work with our dedicated trail volunteers and OC Parks to improve and maintain this trail and the rest of our trail system so that it can withstand the increasingly heavy use it receives while minimizing impacts to the surrounding habitat.

There is a lot of work to do, and we always welcome your involvement. Join us one of our upcoming trail volunteer days by emailing us at alan@lagunacanyon.org.

 

Thanks to Brian Flynn for the photograph!

We all belong in the parks, people and animals alike. The South Coast Wilderness is your open space, and we encourage you to explore it, to enjoy it, and to make it your own.

As you visit the parks and hike or ride the trails, remember that the open space is the home to many creatures: deer, bobcat, coyotes, foxes, snakes, hawks, rabbits, woodrats, insects and native plants. When we venture off trail or allow our dogs in areas preserved for wildlife, we upset a delicate balance of plant and animal life. In addition, it’s dangerous for us and our dogs.

Just as we humans are required to stay on the trails, our furry friends must do the same. Here’s why:

  • Dogs are predators. Wild animals will avoid place that a dog has marked. This reduces the wildlife’s habitat and makes it more difficult to find food.
  • Domestic dog scent disrupts the lives of gray foxes and coyotes, who also mark their territories.
  • Dogs scare native birds, like quail, from their nests. This can cause the death of their young.
  • It’s dangerous for our dogs to be off leash, off trail and where they aren’t allowed.
    • Dogs can pick up poison oak.
    • Dogs can be bitten by rattlesnakes.
    • Dogs get ticks which carry Lyme and other diseases.

When visiting the parks, it’s important to keep dogs on-leash and bring them only on dog-friendly trails. A six-foot leash is required at all times, and dog waste must be picked up. Dogs are not allowed in Laguna Coast Wilderness Park. In Aliso and Wood Canyons Wilderness Park, dogs are allowed on the following trails:

  • Aliso Creek Bike Trail
  • Aliso Peak Trail
  • Aliso Summit Trail
  • Aswut Trail
  • Canyon Acres Trail
  • Pecten Reef Loop Trail
  • Toovet Trail
  • West Ridge Trail

You can download a trail map of Aliso and Wood Canyons here.

In addition, there are many other dog-friendly options near the South Coast Wilderness, including:

Laguna Beach Dog Park
www.lagunabeachdogpark.com
20612 Laguna Canyon Road
Laguna Beach
949-497-0706

A Place for Paws
Ridge Route Drive and Peralta Drive
Laguna Woods
949-639-0500

Costa Mesa Bark Park
www.costamesabarkpark.com
890 Arlington Drive
Costa Mesa
949-733-4101

Laguna Niguel Pooch Park
www.cityoflagunaniguel.org
31461 Golden Lantern
Laguna Niguel
949-362-4300

San Clemente Dog Park
www.san-clemente.org
301 Avenida La Pata
San Clemente
949-361-8264

Thank you for your help in protecting our parks!

Last month, Laguna Canyon Foundation was awarded a $5,000 grant for the South Coast Wilderness Education Program from the Disney VoluntEARS Community Fund! Disneyland Resort’s Director of Workforce Management and long-time LCF volunteer Arland Van Horn presented the check to LCF’s Board.

The Disney VoluntEARS Community Fund program offers a means to give Disney Cast Members (employees) direct involvement in the distribution of charitable funds that they personally contribute. Ms. Van Horn explains, “Each participating Cast Member contributes what they can through direct payroll deductions.  A Leadership Counsel of Cast Members reviewed a large number of grant applications and awarded Laguna Canyon Foundation $5,000. It makes me proud to be a part of both organizations.”

The VoluntEARS Community Fund grant is invitation-only; only organizations nominated by a Disneyland Resort Cast Member personally affiliated with the organization are eligible to apply.

“We are thrilled, and so grateful for Arland’s vote of confidence,” said Hallie Jones, LCF’s Executive Director. “Our education program inspires environmental advocacy and love for the wilderness in the next generation, and Disney VoluntEARS Community Fund’s support will help make that possible.”

Each year, Laguna Canyon Foundation’s education program brings more than 4,500 second through fifth grade students from Orange County Title 1 schools for free field trips into our open space. Our hands-on, standards-based program allows children to hike, explore native plants, see wildlife, and learn about conservation and preservation. Each field trip supports the Next Generation State Science Standards, and focuses on grade-specific topics, including art in nature, adaptations, geology, fitness and nutrition.

Thank you Arland, Disney VoluntEARS, and all of our fantastic supporters and volunteers!

Someone asked me the other day if the South Coast Wilderness (the area around Laguna Beach comprising Laguna Coast and Aliso & Wood Canyons Wilderness Parks, Crystal Cove State Park and other city-owned open space areas) was actually a wilderness. Well now, that depends. What is wilderness? As is true with any word, the definition will vary depending on who you ask and in what context the word is used.

For instance, if you are using this word to refer to an area of that name protected in the United States under the Wilderness Act of 1964 (that is, “Capital-W” or “Designated” Wilderness), then the definition is:

        “… in contrast with those areas where man and his own works dominate the landscape, … an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled [i.e., unconstrained] by man [i.e., humankind], where man himself is a visitor who does not remain.”

In addition to this general definition, there are specific requirements in this statute that must be met, and defined human activities that are prohibited in these areas. For instance, these areas must be free of roads and the use of mechanized equipment (such as motor vehicles, chainsaws and hang gliders) is prohibited except in special circumstances (such as a wildfire).

We can compare this formal, legal definition to a more general one (that is, Google’s):

        “An uncultivated, uninhabited, and inhospitable region.”

That is, a wasteland: an area not useful to humans.

An important thing to remember is that the idea of “wilderness” is just that: an abstract concept created by western civilization and really not that long ago (less than a thousand years, or less than 2% of the existence of “behaviorally modern” humans). It was born out of the idea that humans and nature are separate from and inimical to each other. In most indigenous hunter-gatherer cultures, there is no such thing as the idea of a wilderness and humans are viewed as part of nature rather than something distinct from it.

As humans have become more and more dominant over the planet, the idea that humans and nature are distinct has become harder to maintain. For instance, invasive weeds, air pollution and climate change do not respect boundaries drawn on maps, and have definitely begun to “trammel” areas previously defined as wilderness. The increase in wildland fires and the bark beetle epidemics affecting many wildlands in the American West are a couple of the most glaring examples.

With all of this in mind, let’s look at some definitions of the root word, “wild”, to see if we can gain some more insight:

        “Wild:

        1a : living in a state of nature and not… tame or domesticated <wild ducks>

        b (1) : growing or produced without human aid or care <wild honey> (2) : related to or resembling a

                corresponding cultivated or domesticated organism…

        2a : not inhabited or cultivated <wild land>

         b : not amenable to human habitation or cultivation; also : desolate

        3a (1) : not subject to restraint or regulation : uncontrolled; also : unruly (2) : emotionally overcome

          <wild with grief>; also : passionately eager or enthusiastic <was wild to own a toy train — J. C. Furnas>

         b : marked by turbulent agitation : stormy <a wild night>

         c : going beyond normal or conventional bounds : fantastic <wild ideas>; also : sensational

         d : indicative of strong passion, desire, or emotion <a wild gleam of delight in his eyes — Irish Digest>”

        – Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary (highlights mine)

We see in this the ideas underpinning the above definitions of wilderness, but also a broadening of what it means to be wild that does not depend on a separateness between humans and the rest of the natural world. So if “wilderness” is a place dominated by wild things, then it is a place untamed, undomesticated, not subject to restraint, uncontrolled, unruly, where one can break free of normal or conventional bounds, and maybe even experience strong passions, desires or emotions…to find the wild within.

So, back to the original question: is the South Coast Wilderness a true wilderness?

By conventional and strict definitions, it may not qualify: There are fire roads, bicycles are permitted, and motor vehicles and other mechanized equipment are used by land managers, for instance. Also, due to the fragility of the habitats and very high visitation rates, park users are subject to many restraints on how they can use the Parks that aren’t usually present in Designated Wilderness Areas.

However, relative to its highly-developed and extremely human-dominated surroundings, the South Coast Wilderness is a wilderness indeed: a home to wild things, plant, animal and otherwise, where people can visit to re-connect with the natural world, and maybe even re-connect with the wildness that exists inside every one of us.

The first time I hiked on Lynx trail in Aliso and Wood Canyons Wilderness Park was just last week. It is a steep, rocky, view-rich path between West Ridge trail and Wood Creek, and clearly, it has been cared for. There were drainage efforts and tread improvements to keep hikers on the trail and water off the trail. 

I’ve lived in Laguna Beach for the past thirteen years and was born and raised in Southern California. You’d think I might have known about Lynx, this beautiful treasure of a trail, years ago, but I did not.

As the newly hired Outreach Manager for Laguna Canyon Foundation, I hike with elementary school children weekly in Laguna Coast Wilderness Park, on well-kept, safe, trash free [almost] trails: Stagecoach South, Laurel Canyon, Canyon, Sunflower, Lake, and Little Sycamore, to name a few.

For those of us who live in proximity to these two parks – part of the South Coast Wilderness stretching from Newport Beach to Aliso Viejo – we might not yet know the intimate beauty of the parks: the metamorphic rock formations; the shade of the coast live oak and scent of sage; the sighting of a deer, roadrunner or bobcat; but we do know of its great beauty simply by driving down the 133 and 73, along Aliso Viejo’s Wood Canyon Drive or Laguna Niguel’s Pacific Park Drive.

These protected lands improve our lives as well as our home values. Says Ed McMahon, a Washington D.C.-based expert on open space: “Open space really contributes to the image of a community. The image of a community is fundamentally important to its economic well-being.”

One may wonder, then, how is it that this land is preserved and maintained as well as it is when an estimated 500,000 people visit each year to hike, bike, paint and photograph?

“It is a never-ending project, as you can well imagine,” says Hallie Jones, Executive Director of Laguna Canyon Foundation. “Laguna Canyon Foundation’s mission is to protect and preserve our open space, and with 70 miles of trails and 22,000 acres of wilderness, we have our work cut out for us. It is our volunteers who inspire us with their commitment and hard work.”

Indeed, Laguna Canyon Foundation’s certified, long-term volunteers served more 7,600 hours in 2016. Their work included:

  • Greeting park visitors at the trailheads to answer questions, explain park protocols and offer fun facts about the open space
  • Working closely with OC Parks’ small maintenance staff to maintain authorized trails and reduce social (unauthorized) trails to #KeepItWild
  • Pulling invasive plants, improving trails, and planting native plants and seeds during regular trail maintenance and restoration events
  • Working closely with OC Park Rangers to patrol the park and assist guests needing directions, water or bit of trail advice
  • Leading a variety of bike rides, nursery and plant care events, and hikes – yoga, geology, fitness, educational, child-friendly – to help enhance the visitors’ enjoyment and understanding of the open space

In addition, Laguna Canyon Foundation’s short-term volunteers, those who come, from time to time, to our trail events to pick up trash, plant, weed, water and shore up trails, logged more than 2,000 hours.

Baba Dioum, a Senegalese forestry engineer, said to the International Union for Conservation of Nature:

“In the end, we will conserve what we love;
 we will love only what we understand;
and we will understand only what we are taught.”

Laguna Canyon Foundation’s volunteers spread the message of preservation and conservation with kindness, knowledge and a bit of fun. They love the land and it shows. We are forever grateful for the volunteers’ support.

So, whether you ever step foot in the open space to explore trails new to you or prefer to enjoy the beauty from a distance, thank a volunteer for helping #ProtectWhatYouLove.

Happy Holidays.